Valorizing Racial Boundaries: Hegemony and Conflict in the Racialization of Filipino Migrant Labour in the United States

Title:
Valorizing Racial Boundaries: Hegemony and Conflict in the Racialization of Filipino Migrant Labour in the United States
Authors:
Baldoz, Richard
Abstract:
This article examines the role of the “racial state” in delimiting the socio-economic mobility of Filipino immigrants in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century. I illustrate how racial statecraft was deployed to restrict the access of Filipino immigrants to citizenship, family formation and land ownership through exclusionary racial criteria. I argue that the state instituted ascribed racial categories as the principal means of differentiating the civic status and social resources available to racialized collectivities. Filipino immigrants in the United States offer an interesting case study because of their status as colonial subjects of the United States. The precarious political and racial status of Filipinos made the enforcement of racial boundaries a complex issue that was contested by both whites and Filipinos and eventually led to a prohibition on Filipino immigration to the United States in the 1930s.
Citation:
Baldoz, Richard. 2004. "Valorizing Racial Boundaries: Hegemony and Conflict in the Racialization of Filipino Migrant Labour in the United States." Ethnic and Racial Studies 27(6): 969-986.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
DATE ISSUED:
2004-11
Department:
French and Italian
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1080/0141987042000268558
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309679

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBaldoz, Richarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:14:54Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:14:54Zen
dc.date.issued2004-11en
dc.identifier.citationBaldoz, Richard. 2004. "Valorizing Racial Boundaries: Hegemony and Conflict in the Racialization of Filipino Migrant Labour in the United States." Ethnic and Racial Studies 27(6): 969-986.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0141-9870en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309679en
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the role of the “racial state” in delimiting the socio-economic mobility of Filipino immigrants in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century. I illustrate how racial statecraft was deployed to restrict the access of Filipino immigrants to citizenship, family formation and land ownership through exclusionary racial criteria. I argue that the state instituted ascribed racial categories as the principal means of differentiating the civic status and social resources available to racialized collectivities. Filipino immigrants in the United States offer an interesting case study because of their status as colonial subjects of the United States. The precarious political and racial status of Filipinos made the enforcement of racial boundaries a complex issue that was contested by both whites and Filipinos and eventually led to a prohibition on Filipino immigration to the United States in the 1930s.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0141987042000268558en
dc.subject.departmentFrench and Italianen_US
dc.titleValorizing Racial Boundaries: Hegemony and Conflict in the Racialization of Filipino Migrant Labour in the United Statesen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalEthnic and Racial Studiesen_US
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