Correlating multiple Neoarchean–Paleoproterozoic impact spherule layers between South Africa and Western Australia

Title:
Correlating multiple Neoarchean–Paleoproterozoic impact spherule layers between South Africa and Western Australia
Authors:
Simonson, Bruce M.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Johnson, S.; Gutzmer, J.
Abstract:
Well-studied successions in the Griqualand West Basin (South Africa) and the Hamersley Basin (Western Australia) that both straddle the Archean–Proterozoic boundary have been correlated on the basis of numerous lithostratigraphic similarities. Each succession hosts a minimum of three impact spherule layers, implying a minimum of three large impacts by extraterrestrial objects over a time span of about 140 million years. The occurrences of the youngest spherule layers in both basins in comparable stratigraphic positions in banded iron formations that have already been correlated suggest the youngest pair of layers were formed by a single impact. Close similarities in stratigraphic setting, age, and petrographic characteristics of the spherules, as well as the restriction of distinctive irregular melt particles to only these layers, suggest the oldest layers in the two basins were likewise formed by a single impact. In contrast, the middle layers on the two continents differ significantly in both their stratigraphic positions and the textures of the spherules, suggesting they are products of different impact events. These results suggest that using impact spherule layers to establish a global network of high-resolution stratigraphic markers for early Precambrian successions may be an achievable goal, but careful comparisons between potentially correlative layers will be necessary to achieve it.
Citation:
Simonson, B.M., D. Sumner, N.J. Beukes, S. Johnson, and J. Gutzmer. 2009. "Correlating multiple Neoarchean–Paleoproterozoic impact spherule layers between South Africa and Western Australia." Precambrian Research 169(1-4): 100-111.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2009-03
Department:
Geology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.precamres.2008.10.016
Additional Links:
http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/article.cgi?issn=03019268&issue=v169i1-4&article=100_cmnislbsaawa
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309447

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSimonson, Bruce M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSumner, Dawn Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeukes, Nicolas J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGutzmer, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:09:49Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:09:49Zen
dc.date.issued2009-03en
dc.identifier.citationSimonson, B.M., D. Sumner, N.J. Beukes, S. Johnson, and J. Gutzmer. 2009. "Correlating multiple Neoarchean–Paleoproterozoic impact spherule layers between South Africa and Western Australia." Precambrian Research 169(1-4): 100-111.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-9268en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309447en
dc.description.abstractWell-studied successions in the Griqualand West Basin (South Africa) and the Hamersley Basin (Western Australia) that both straddle the Archean–Proterozoic boundary have been correlated on the basis of numerous lithostratigraphic similarities. Each succession hosts a minimum of three impact spherule layers, implying a minimum of three large impacts by extraterrestrial objects over a time span of about 140 million years. The occurrences of the youngest spherule layers in both basins in comparable stratigraphic positions in banded iron formations that have already been correlated suggest the youngest pair of layers were formed by a single impact. Close similarities in stratigraphic setting, age, and petrographic characteristics of the spherules, as well as the restriction of distinctive irregular melt particles to only these layers, suggest the oldest layers in the two basins were likewise formed by a single impact. In contrast, the middle layers on the two continents differ significantly in both their stratigraphic positions and the textures of the spherules, suggesting they are products of different impact events. These results suggest that using impact spherule layers to establish a global network of high-resolution stratigraphic markers for early Precambrian successions may be an achievable goal, but careful comparisons between potentially correlative layers will be necessary to achieve it.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.precamres.2008.10.016en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/article.cgi?issn=03019268&issue=v169i1-4&article=100_cmnislbsaawaen_GB
dc.subject.departmentGeologyen_US
dc.titleCorrelating multiple Neoarchean–Paleoproterozoic impact spherule layers between South Africa and Western Australiaen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalPrecambrian Researchen_US
dc.subject.keywordImpact spherulesen_US
dc.subject.keywordImpact ejectaen_US
dc.subject.keywordNeoarcheanen_US
dc.subject.keywordPaleoproterozoicen_US
dc.subject.keywordHamersleyen_US
dc.subject.keywordTransvaalen_US
dc.identifier.volume169en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-4en_US
dc.identifier.startpage100-111en_US
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