A Multivariate Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Sprawl versus Compact Living in the US for 2003

Title:
A Multivariate Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Sprawl versus Compact Living in the US for 2003
Authors:
Shammin, Md Rumi; Herendeen, Robert A.; Hanson, Michelle J.; Wilson, Eric J. H.
Abstract:
We explore the energy intensity of sprawl versus compact living by analyzing the total energy requirements of U.S. households for the year 2003. The methods used are based on previous studies on energy cost of living. Total energy requirement is calculated as a function of individual energy intensities of goods and services derived from economic input–output analysis and expenditures for those goods and services. We use multivariate regression analysis to estimate patterns in household energy intensities. We define sprawl in terms of location in rural areas or in areas with low population size. We find that even though sprawl-related factors account for about 83% of the average household energy consumption, sprawl is only 17–19% more energy intensive than compact living based on how people actually lived. We observe that some of the advantages of reduced direct energy use by people living in high density urban centers are offset by their consumption of other non-energy products. A more detailed analysis reveals that lifestyle choices (household type, number of vehicles, and family size) that could be independent of location play a significant role in determining household energy intensity. We develop two models that offer opportunities for further analysis.
Citation:
Shammin, M., R. Herendeen, M. Hanson, and E. Wilson. 2010. "A Multivariate Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Sprawl versus Compact Living in the US for 2003." Ecological Economics 69(12): 2363-2373.
Publisher:
Elsevier for International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE)
DATE ISSUED:
2010
Department:
Environmental Studies
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.ecolecon.2010.07.003
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309399

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShammin, Md Rumien_US
dc.contributor.authorHerendeen, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Michelle J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Eric J. H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:08:50Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:08:50Zen
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationShammin, M., R. Herendeen, M. Hanson, and E. Wilson. 2010. "A Multivariate Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Sprawl versus Compact Living in the US for 2003." Ecological Economics 69(12): 2363-2373.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0921-8009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309399en
dc.description.abstractWe explore the energy intensity of sprawl versus compact living by analyzing the total energy requirements of U.S. households for the year 2003. The methods used are based on previous studies on energy cost of living. Total energy requirement is calculated as a function of individual energy intensities of goods and services derived from economic input–output analysis and expenditures for those goods and services. We use multivariate regression analysis to estimate patterns in household energy intensities. We define sprawl in terms of location in rural areas or in areas with low population size. We find that even though sprawl-related factors account for about 83% of the average household energy consumption, sprawl is only 17–19% more energy intensive than compact living based on how people actually lived. We observe that some of the advantages of reduced direct energy use by people living in high density urban centers are offset by their consumption of other non-energy products. A more detailed analysis reveals that lifestyle choices (household type, number of vehicles, and family size) that could be independent of location play a significant role in determining household energy intensity. We develop two models that offer opportunities for further analysis.en_US
dc.publisherElsevier for International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE)en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolecon.2010.07.003en
dc.subject.departmentEnvironmental Studiesen_US
dc.titleA Multivariate Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Sprawl versus Compact Living in the US for 2003en_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalEcological Economicsen_US
dc.identifier.volume69en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.startpage2363en_US
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