Image and Illustration in Jean Fouquet's "Grandes Chroniques de France"

Title:
Image and Illustration in Jean Fouquet's "Grandes Chroniques de France"
Authors:
Inglis, Erik
Abstract:
This article studies the miniatures that Jean Fouquet painted for a mid-fifteenth-century copy of the Grandes Chroniques de France. I argue that the contextual interpretation of illuminated historical manuscripts must begin by determining how specific events were selected for illustration. In Fouquet's Grandes Chroniques, the choice of subjects is more closely related to the preexisting structure of the text than to the manuscript's immediate political context, indicating that his pictures were more important as images than as illustrations of specific events. Having distinguished image from illustration, I then discuss how his images contributed to the book's persuasive visual appeal, mining contemporary chronicles for a period vocabulary appropriate to Fouquet's images. I then turn to their role as illustrations, analyzing six pictures whose subject matter is clearly related to contemporary French concerns, specifically images of English rulers and French participation in the Crusades.
Citation:
Inglis, Erik. "Image and Illustration in Jean Fouquet's 'Grandes Chroniques de France'." French Historical Studies, 26/2 (2003), 185-224.
Publisher:
Duke University Press
DATE ISSUED:
2003
Department:
Art
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1215/00161071-26-2-185
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309336

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorInglis, Eriken_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:07:30Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:07:30Zen
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.citationInglis, Erik. "Image and Illustration in Jean Fouquet's 'Grandes Chroniques de France'." French Historical Studies, 26/2 (2003), 185-224.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-1071en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309336en
dc.description.abstractThis article studies the miniatures that Jean Fouquet painted for a mid-fifteenth-century copy of the Grandes Chroniques de France. I argue that the contextual interpretation of illuminated historical manuscripts must begin by determining how specific events were selected for illustration. In Fouquet's Grandes Chroniques, the choice of subjects is more closely related to the preexisting structure of the text than to the manuscript's immediate political context, indicating that his pictures were more important as images than as illustrations of specific events. Having distinguished image from illustration, I then discuss how his images contributed to the book's persuasive visual appeal, mining contemporary chronicles for a period vocabulary appropriate to Fouquet's images. I then turn to their role as illustrations, analyzing six pictures whose subject matter is clearly related to contemporary French concerns, specifically images of English rulers and French participation in the Crusades.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDuke University Pressen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1215/00161071-26-2-185en
dc.subject.departmentArten_US
dc.titleImage and Illustration in Jean Fouquet's "Grandes Chroniques de France"en_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalFrench Historical Studiesen_US
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