Talking in another person’s shoes: Incremental perspective-taking in language processing

Title:
Talking in another person’s shoes: Incremental perspective-taking in language processing
Authors:
Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Hanna, Joy E.
Abstract:
Language use in conversation is fundamentally incremental, and is guided by the representations that interlocutors maintain of each others knowledge and beliefs. While there is a consensus that interlocutors represent the perspective of others, three candidate models, a Perspective-Adjustment model, an Anticipation-Integration model, and a Constraint-Based model, make conflicting predictions about the role of perspective information during on-line language processing. Here we review psycholinguistic evidence for incrementality in language processing, and the recent methodological advance that has fostered its investigationthe use of eye-tracking in the visual world paradigm. We present visual world studies of perspective-taking, and evaluate each model's account of the data. We argue for a Constraint-Based view in which perspective is one of multiple probabilistic constraints that guide language processing decisions. Addressees combine knowledge of a speakers perspective with rich information from the discourse context to arrive at an interpretation of what was said. Understanding how these sources of information combine to influence interpretation requires careful consideration of how perspective representations were established, and how they are relevant to the communicative context.
Citation:
Brown-Schmidt, Sarah, and Joy E. Hanna. 2011. "Talking in another person’s shoes: Incremental perspective-taking in language processing." Dialogue & Discourse 2: 11-33.
Publisher:
Dialogue & Discourse
DATE ISSUED:
2011
Department:
Psychology
Type:
article
Additional Links:
http://elanguage.net/journals/dad/article/view/364
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309314

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown-Schmidt, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorHanna, Joy E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:07:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:07:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationBrown-Schmidt, Sarah, and Joy E. Hanna. 2011. "Talking in another person’s shoes: Incremental perspective-taking in language processing." Dialogue & Discourse 2: 11-33.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2152-9620en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309314-
dc.description.abstractLanguage use in conversation is fundamentally incremental, and is guided by the representations that interlocutors maintain of each others knowledge and beliefs. While there is a consensus that interlocutors represent the perspective of others, three candidate models, a Perspective-Adjustment model, an Anticipation-Integration model, and a Constraint-Based model, make conflicting predictions about the role of perspective information during on-line language processing. Here we review psycholinguistic evidence for incrementality in language processing, and the recent methodological advance that has fostered its investigationthe use of eye-tracking in the visual world paradigm. We present visual world studies of perspective-taking, and evaluate each model's account of the data. We argue for a Constraint-Based view in which perspective is one of multiple probabilistic constraints that guide language processing decisions. Addressees combine knowledge of a speakers perspective with rich information from the discourse context to arrive at an interpretation of what was said. Understanding how these sources of information combine to influence interpretation requires careful consideration of how perspective representations were established, and how they are relevant to the communicative context.en_US
dc.publisherDialogue & Discourseen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://elanguage.net/journals/dad/article/view/364en_GB
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleTalking in another person’s shoes: Incremental perspective-taking in language processingen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalDialogue & Discourseen_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage11en_US
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.