African American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: Social integration, social status, and social behavior

Title:
African American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: Social integration, social status, and social behavior
Authors:
Wilson, Travis; Rodkin, Philip C.
Abstract:
With a sample of African American and European American 3rd- and 4th-grade children (N = 486, ages 8–11 years), this study examined classroom ethnic composition, peer social status (i.e., social preference and perceived popularity as nominated by same- and cross-ethnicity peers), and patterns of ethnic segregation (i.e., friendship, peer group, and cross-ethnicity dislike). African American—but not European American—children had more segregated relationships and were more disliked by cross-ethnicity peers when they had fewer same-ethnicity classmates. African American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity and with cross-ethnicity perceived popularity. European American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference but negatively associated with cross-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity.
Citation:
Wilson, Travis, and P. C. Rodkin. 2011. "African American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: Social integration, social status, and social behavior." Child Development 82: 1454-1469.
Publisher:
Wiley for Society for Research in Child Development
DATE ISSUED:
2011
Department:
Psychology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01634.x
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309263

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodkin, Philip C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:05:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:05:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationWilson, Travis, and P. C. Rodkin. 2011. "African American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: Social integration, social status, and social behavior." Child Development 82: 1454-1469.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-3920en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309263-
dc.description.abstractWith a sample of African American and European American 3rd- and 4th-grade children (N = 486, ages 8–11 years), this study examined classroom ethnic composition, peer social status (i.e., social preference and perceived popularity as nominated by same- and cross-ethnicity peers), and patterns of ethnic segregation (i.e., friendship, peer group, and cross-ethnicity dislike). African American—but not European American—children had more segregated relationships and were more disliked by cross-ethnicity peers when they had fewer same-ethnicity classmates. African American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity and with cross-ethnicity perceived popularity. European American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference but negatively associated with cross-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity.en_US
dc.publisherWiley for Society for Research in Child Developmenten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01634.x-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleAfrican American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: Social integration, social status, and social behavioren_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalChild Developmenten_US
dc.identifier.volume82en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1454en_US
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