'Demographic modernity’ in Ireland: A cultural analysis of citizenship, migration, and fertility

Title:
'Demographic modernity’ in Ireland: A cultural analysis of citizenship, migration, and fertility
Authors:
Lele, Veerendra
Citation:
Lele, Veerendra. "Demographic Modernity’ in Ireland: A Cultural Analysis of Citizenship, Migration, and Fertility." Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe 8.1 (2008): 5-17.
Publisher:
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe
DATE ISSUED:
2008
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5032; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
In June 2004 citizens in Ireland voted on a constitutional referendum which proposed “to change the rules about the constitutional entitlement to citizenship by birth.” Te proposed change and subsequent vote in favor of the referendum generated a variety of commentary and scholarship. While factors of political economy and a racialized discourse regarding immigration are central to understanding contemporary change in Ireland, this article examines the changing demographic and related cultural conditions corresponding with the referendum through three interrelated yet analytically distinguishable strands: a) population change, specifically patterns of migration and fertility; b) changing notions of Irish and European modernity and identity; and c) Ireland's historical experience of colonialism and diaspora. ‘Demographic modernity’ in Ireland is a cultural complex that interprets social demographic factors such as (low) fertility, high life expectancy, timing of first births and of marriage, low infant/child mortality, and variable standards of migration and mobility in relation to political and historical discourses about nation and person.
ISSN:
15355632
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLele, Veerendraen
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T18:38:19Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:06:36Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T18:38:19Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:06:36Z-
dc.date.created2008en
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationLele, Veerendra. "Demographic Modernity’ in Ireland: A Cultural Analysis of Citizenship, Migration, and Fertility." Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe 8.1 (2008): 5-17.en_US
dc.identifier.issn15355632en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5032en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionIn June 2004 citizens in Ireland voted on a constitutional referendum which proposed “to change the rules about the constitutional entitlement to citizenship by birth.” Te proposed change and subsequent vote in favor of the referendum generated a variety of commentary and scholarship. While factors of political economy and a racialized discourse regarding immigration are central to understanding contemporary change in Ireland, this article examines the changing demographic and related cultural conditions corresponding with the referendum through three interrelated yet analytically distinguishable strands: a) population change, specifically patterns of migration and fertility; b) changing notions of Irish and European modernity and identity; and c) Ireland's historical experience of colonialism and diaspora. ‘Demographic modernity’ in Ireland is a cultural complex that interprets social demographic factors such as (low) fertility, high life expectancy, timing of first births and of marriage, low infant/child mortality, and variable standards of migration and mobility in relation to political and historical discourses about nation and person.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.title'Demographic modernity’ in Ireland: A cultural analysis of citizenship, migration, and fertilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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