Reading dialogic correspondence: Synge's The Aran Islands

Title:
Reading dialogic correspondence: Synge's The Aran Islands
Authors:
Lele, Veerendra
Citation:
Lele, Veerendra. "Reading Dialogic Correspondence: Synge's the Aran Islands." New Hibernia Review 11.4 (2008): 124-9.
Publisher:
New Hibernia Review
DATE ISSUED:
Jan-2008
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5031; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
After one hundred years, how might we read John Millington Synge’s The Aran Islands anthropologically and ethnographically? The book bears a long history of interpretations by Synge’s contemporaries, by literary artists and scholars, and by anthropologists.1 All of these interpreters critique, correctly, the romantic interests in “primitives” particular to both the Revivalist political aesthetic and to early colonial anthropology—and to its product, fieldwork ethnography. More recently, scholars have salvaged Synge from the Orientalist-cum-nationalist box and argued that he develops an early form of realism from a “displaced nostalgia.”2 Scholars also note that while conforming to the still-emergent ethnographic conventions of his time, Synge simultaneously challenges these conventions through his autobiographic presence" (Lele 124).
ISSN:
15345815
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLele, Veerendraen
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T18:36:19Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:06:34Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T18:36:19Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:06:34Z-
dc.date.created2008-01en
dc.date.issued2008-01en
dc.identifier.citationLele, Veerendra. "Reading Dialogic Correspondence: Synge's the Aran Islands." New Hibernia Review 11.4 (2008): 124-9.en_US
dc.identifier.issn15345815en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5031en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionAfter one hundred years, how might we read John Millington Synge’s The Aran Islands anthropologically and ethnographically? The book bears a long history of interpretations by Synge’s contemporaries, by literary artists and scholars, and by anthropologists.1 All of these interpreters critique, correctly, the romantic interests in “primitives” particular to both the Revivalist political aesthetic and to early colonial anthropology—and to its product, fieldwork ethnography. More recently, scholars have salvaged Synge from the Orientalist-cum-nationalist box and argued that he develops an early form of realism from a “displaced nostalgia.”2 Scholars also note that while conforming to the still-emergent ethnographic conventions of his time, Synge simultaneously challenges these conventions through his autobiographic presence" (Lele 124).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNew Hibernia Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titleReading dialogic correspondence: Synge's The Aran Islandsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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