Title:
The nature of artifacts
Authors:
Vogel, Steven
Citation:
Vogel, Steven. "The Nature of Artifacts." Environmental Ethics 25.2 2003: 149-168.
Publisher:
Environmental Ethics
DATE ISSUED:
2003
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5010; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
Philosophers such as Eric Katz and Robert Elliot have argued against ecological restoration on the grounds that restored landscapes are no longer natural. Katz calls them "artifacts," but the sharp distinction between nature and artifact doesn't hold up. Why should the products of one particular natural species be seen as somehow escaping nature? Katz's account identifies an artifact too tightly with the intentions of its creator: artifacts always have more to them than what their creators intended, and furthermore the intention behind some artifacts might explicitly be to allow things to happen unpredictably. Indeed, to build any artifact is to employ forces that go beyond the builder in this sense all artifacts are natural. Recognizing the naturalness of artifacts can help encourage the key environmental virtues of self-knowledge and humility.
ISSN:
01634275
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVogel, Stevenen
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T16:47:26Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:05:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T16:47:26Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:05:15Z-
dc.date.created2003en
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.citationVogel, Steven. "The Nature of Artifacts." Environmental Ethics 25.2 2003: 149-168.en_US
dc.identifier.issn01634275en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5010en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionPhilosophers such as Eric Katz and Robert Elliot have argued against ecological restoration on the grounds that restored landscapes are no longer natural. Katz calls them "artifacts," but the sharp distinction between nature and artifact doesn't hold up. Why should the products of one particular natural species be seen as somehow escaping nature? Katz's account identifies an artifact too tightly with the intentions of its creator: artifacts always have more to them than what their creators intended, and furthermore the intention behind some artifacts might explicitly be to allow things to happen unpredictably. Indeed, to build any artifact is to employ forces that go beyond the builder in this sense all artifacts are natural. Recognizing the naturalness of artifacts can help encourage the key environmental virtues of self-knowledge and humility.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherEnvironmental Ethicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titleThe nature of artifactsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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