Music and materials: Art and science of organ pipe metal

Title:
Music and materials: Art and science of organ pipe metal
Authors:
Oertel, Catherine M.; Richards, Annette
Abstract:
Historical pipe organs offer rich insights into the relationships between materials and music in the past, and they represent a laboratory for contemporary materials science. Recent cross-disciplinary research has explored problems of conservation and corrosion in old organ pipes. The ability of some notable European Baroque organs to produce sound is threatened by atmospheric corrosion of their lead-tin alloy pipes. Organic acids emitted from the wood of organ cases are corrosive agents for lead-rich pipes. Laboratory exposure experiments were used to study the roles of humidity and alloy composition in the susceptibility to organic acid attack. The rates of growth, as well as the compositions and morphologies of the corrosion products were studied using gravimetry, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy of surfaces and cross sections. This interdisciplinary project provides one model for the interplay of scientific and humanities research in addressing materials problems in cultural heritage.
Citation:
Oertel, Catherine M., and Annette Richards. 2017. "Music and materials: Art and science of organ pipe metal." MRS Bulletin 42(1): 55-61.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
DATE ISSUED:
2017-01
Department:
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1557/mrs.2016.294
Additional Links:
https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0883769416002943/type/journal_article
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620534

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOertel, Catherine M.en
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Annetteen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-25T15:39:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-25T15:39:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-
dc.identifier.citationOertel, Catherine M., and Annette Richards. 2017. "Music and materials: Art and science of organ pipe metal." MRS Bulletin 42(1): 55-61.en
dc.identifier.issn0883-7694-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620534-
dc.description.abstractHistorical pipe organs offer rich insights into the relationships between materials and music in the past, and they represent a laboratory for contemporary materials science. Recent cross-disciplinary research has explored problems of conservation and corrosion in old organ pipes. The ability of some notable European Baroque organs to produce sound is threatened by atmospheric corrosion of their lead-tin alloy pipes. Organic acids emitted from the wood of organ cases are corrosive agents for lead-rich pipes. Laboratory exposure experiments were used to study the roles of humidity and alloy composition in the susceptibility to organic acid attack. The rates of growth, as well as the compositions and morphologies of the corrosion products were studied using gravimetry, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy of surfaces and cross sections. This interdisciplinary project provides one model for the interplay of scientific and humanities research in addressing materials problems in cultural heritage.en_US
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.identifier.doi10.1557/mrs.2016.294-
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0883769416002943/type/journal_articleen
dc.subject.departmentChemistry and Biochemistryen_US
dc.titleMusic and materials: Art and science of organ pipe metalen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMRS Bulletinen
dc.subject.keywordAcetic-acid vaporen_US
dc.subject.keywordAtmospheric corrosionen_US
dc.subject.keywordLeaden_US
dc.subject.keywordEnvironmentsen_US
dc.subject.keywordTinen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage55en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to MRS Bulletinen
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.